Benziger Breakthrough

Category:Physiology of Typology

THE PHYSIOLOGY OF TYPE: JUNG’S FOUR FUNCTIONS

By Katherine Benziger, Ph.D.

So much has been discovered in the past ten to twenty years that it is now possible to be relatively certain about the physiological bases for Dr. Jungâ??s Typology. To start with , one can begin to understand the physiology of Jungâ??s four functions, by developing a working familiarity with the following physiological terms:    Continue Reading »

THE PHYSIOLOGY OF TYPE FALSIFICATION OF TYPE AND PASS (Prolonged Adaption Stress Syndrome)

By Arlene Taylor PhD and Katherine Benziger PhD

OVERVIEW

Human beings are perhaps healthiest, happiest, and most successful when they can use and be rewarded for using their own innate giftedness, or what Dr. Carl Jung and Dr. Katherine Benziger call their natural lead function. Indeed, it can be said that when a person develops and uses his/her natural lead function in an environment which both supports and rewards that function, the experience is similar to if not identical with the experience of flow, identified by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi in Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience.  Continue Reading »

THE PHYSIOLOGY OF TYPE: INTROVERSION AND EXTRAVERSION

By Katherine Benziger, Ph.D.

Introduction

This is an essay on the physiology of Type. For Jung, the word Type was 1 convenient short hand which allowed him to identify with one label, both a personâ??s preference for either Introversion or Extraversion, and as well their Natural Lead Function: Thinking, Sensing, Feeling, Intuition. He might, for example, have referred to one person as â??An Introverted Feelerâ? and another as â??An Extraverted Sensor.â? As it happens, today the physiological foundations for both elements of Jungâ??s model are known. This is particularly exciting as it not only confirms Jungâ??s observations as science, but as well provides exciting new insights.    Continue Reading »

THE HUMAN BRAIN: A RESERVOIR OF DIVERSE FLEXIBLE STRENGTH OR CHAOTIC RAGING VIOLENCE

© 1996 Katherine Benziger, Ph.D. and Sue Holmes

ABSTRACT

The human brain is a complex, elegantly wired machine that is designed to help us live, negotiate reality and ultimately to thrive. How well our brain does this is a function of two very different but inter-related processes: our internal communication with ourselves, in which we do or do not “listen” and respond respectfully to our brain’s evaluation of and signals concerning what we are experiencing or doing; and external pressures exerted by our environment (e.g. climate) and by the dominant social, economic and work patterns, which differentially use or reward specific capabilities. Thus, although fundamentally the human brain is designed to respond to many, many “problems” or “situations” appropriately – utilizing those capabilities that match the situation – in practice our reality often leads over time to diminished flexibility.    Continue Reading »

RETHINKING STRESS, DEPRESSION AND MID-LIFE CRISIS

By Katherine Benziger, Ph.D.

Recent literature – including a two-part article in The New England Journal of Medicine on “Clinical and Biochemical Manifestations of Depression Relative to the Neurobiology of Stress” by Drs. Philip Gold, Frederick Goodwin and George Chrousos; and Why Zebra’s Don’t Get Ulcers by Dr. Robert M. Sapolsky – suggests that there is a direct and important connection between stress and depression. In this response, I would like to explore this connection further; propose a model of depression which identifies a Depressive Continuum; and identify and explore the interconnectedness between three key factors which appear to determine whether a person experiences mild, moderate or sever depression (symptoms).     Continue Reading »

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